Plant by plant – end of November 09

A rundown of how just about every plant in the garden is doing as of the 30 November 2009.

Beetroot rows

Beetroot rows, a startling contrast

Beetroot

A definite problem with the plants in the lower row, as mentioned in previous posts.

Carrots

Two rows of carrots growing well

Carrots

Coming along fairly nicely in both rows. The plants at the upper end of the right row are doing better, while it’s the middle of the left had row where they’re doing best. Hmm…

Climbing beans and their trellis

The six climbing beans

Beans

Of the six plants, three are doing very well, one reasonably well, and two are very stunted. So, a 50 to 60%% success rate, I suppose you’d call it. But the laggards may yet pick up their game – too early to call.

Cherry tomato - the leafy one

Cherry tomato - the leafy one

Tomatoes

One of the two tomato plants in the main bed is growing profusely. The other, while going okay, has a lot less foliage, but it’s the one that currently has the flowers – a range of  small yellow blossoms.

Cherry tomato - the one with flowers

Cherry tomato - the one with flowers

Meanwhile over in The Annexe, its two cherry tomatoes are very similar to each other in terms of growth patterns, though neither of them has flowers or is as leafy as its cousin over in the main bed.

The four chilli plants in the main bed

The four chilli plants in the main bed, some of them flowering

Chillies

Not much to report here. They all seem to be growing reasonably well, no matter what bed they’re in. I do need to mound up one of the chillies in The Annexe soon as it has started to lie down on the job a bit too much…

The three Lebanese cucumbers in the main bed

The three Lebanese cucumbers in the main bed

Cucumbers

Wherever they be planted (3 in the main bed, one over in The Annexe) the Lebanese cucumbers are doing darned well. As I’ve previously mentioned the plant beside the metal fence behind The Annexe does get very heat stressed and droopy during the hottest, sunniest part of the day. But as the sun goes off it during the afternoon the leaves revive and the plant soon looks much healthier.

Lebanese cucumber and cherry tomato, The Annexe

Lebanese cucumber and cherry tomato, The Annexe

Still, I think I’ll just give it a watering a little more often than the other plants, to compensate for the extra strain I’ve unwittingly subjected it to.

Sweet corn, main bed, 30 Nov 2009

The sweet corn in the main bed

Sweet corn

While all 6 of these plants are looking tall and leafy, there can be no doubt that the three set in the higher part of the garden are growing faster than the three lower ones. They obviously have the advantage.

Eschallots

Too soon to tell!

Conclusion

Regardless of their species, the plants on the elevated central spine of the garden bed definitely seem to be doing better overall. Methinks that after these crops are harvested I’ll be giving the bed a general levelling out, as I suggested I might do in another post, and hopefully this will result in better success rates right across the bed, not just in the one area.

Tip: Make sure your garden bed is level, to give all plants an equal opportunity and their fair share of the sun and soil.

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